FAQs

Q?Why does my front suspension make a loud noise when I drive over a bump?
A.

This may be the result of worn out suspension bushings. Suspension bushings are rubber parts located in various locations on suspension components. If they wear out and tear, the suspension may bang against the frame, creating a loud noise. Driving with torn and/or worn bushings can be unsafe. Peculiar sounds and senses should be addressed by an automotive service professional.

Q?What does ABS stand for?
A.

ABS is the Anti-lock Braking System. It senses when the brakes are about to cause a wheel lockup and relieves pressure to keep the wheel moving. You have more control over your vehicle when the wheels are moving, not sliding. The ABS is most effective in wet and/or icy conditions.

Q?When I step on the brake pedal, the brakes shake rapidly. What does this mean?
A.

Warped rotors may be the cause of this problem. If you live in the mountains or drive hills regularly, this occurs because of the constant use of brakes while coming downhill. This can also be the result of the brake calipers corroding. Be aware of constant shaking, as it can wear out chassis components and steering gear.

Q?My fuel mileage seems to be decreasing. What can I do to improve my fuel mileage?
A.

There are many factors that can effect fuel mileage. Low tire air pressure, type of fuel, improper oil viscosity, dirty air filters, lack of maintenance or improper engine valve adjustment are all contributing factors. We recommend factory suggested maintenance to keep your vehicle at optimum performance.

Q?My car does not drive as smoothly as it used to. What can I do to improve the way my car feels when I drive it?
A.

Replacing worn shock absorbers and suspension components will make a noticeable improvement in the feel of your vehicle, while driving. Worn tires can also effect the way the car feels, while driving. Maintenance inspections are helpful to detect wearing of shocks, suspension components and tires.

Q?I do oil changes regularly; Why is my oil so much darker when I change it?
A.

Engine oil is a light brown color before you put it into the engine and black when you change it out. The oil traps oxidized oil and metal that come off engine parts, which causes it to appear black.